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552nd ACNS NCO’s quick response embodies Wingman concept

Tech. Sgt. Kevin, from the 552nd Air Control Networks Squadron, put his CPR training to good use during the holiday season. The sergeant rendered emergency aid to a motorist who had suffered a heart attack, performing CPR until medical personnel arrived on scene. (Courtesy photo)

Tech. Sgt. Kevin, from the 552nd Air Control Networks Squadron, put his CPR training to good use during the holiday season. The sergeant rendered emergency aid to a motorist who had suffered a heart attack, performing CPR until medical personnel arrived on scene. (Courtesy photo)

TINKER AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. --

While out shopping before the holidays, Tech. Sgt. Kevin, a unit deployment manager with the 552nd Air Control Wing’s Air Control Networks Squadron, came upon an accident scene at Eastern and S.E. 12th Street in Moore, Okla.

The sergeant noticed two people helping someone out of a stalled vehicle in the turning lane. The person in distress was driving when he suffered a heart attack.

“As soon as I got out of my car to see what was going on, I realized the person assisting was performing incorrect chest compressions,” said Sergeant Kevin, a certified Combat Life Saver who had recently completed CPR certification. 

Deciding his expertise was necessary to provide emergency medical assistance, Sergeant Kevin directed a bystander to retrieve an Automated External Defibrillator from the CVS Pharmacy on the nearby corner while he began performing correct chest compressions on the unconscious individual.

“As soon as I started the chest compressions, all I could think about was giving this guy a chance,” Sergeant Kevin said. The police arrived while he was still performing chest compressions and cleared the area so there would be no interference.

“I had to continue CPR while the medics were clearing the area and preparing the AED,” said Sergeant Kevin.

Once the AED was ready for operation, the medics took over for Sergeant Kevin, who had been performing CPR for more than five minutes, and the patient was then transferred to an area medical center for further treatment.

“He is the embodiment of the Wingman Concept so it’s not surprising he rose to the occasion,” said Master Sgt. Travis, Sergeant Kevin’s supervisor. “Kevin responded to the accident out of natural instinct, and an inherent responsibility to take care of his community Wingman.”